SUBSTRATA MAIN PAGE


Butyrivibrio

RANK: Genus

TAXONOMY: Bacteria -> Terrabacteria group -> Firmicutes -> Clostridia -> Clostridiales -> Lachnospiraceae -> Butyrivibrio

OVERVIEW:

'Butyrivibrio' is a genus of bacteria in Class Clostridia. Bacteria of this genus are common in the gastrointestinal systems of many animals. Genus Butyrivibrio was first described by Bryant and Small (1956) as anaerobic, butyric acid-producing, curved rods (or vibroids). Butyrivibrio cells are small, typically 0.4 – 0.6 µm by 2 – 5 µm. They are motile, using a single polar or subpolar monotrichous flagellum. They are commonly found singly or in short chains but it is not unusual for them to form long chains. Despite historically being described as Gram-negative, (Bryant & Small, 1956) their cell walls contain derivatives of teichoic acid, (Cheng & Costerton, 1977) and electron microscopy indicates that bacteria of this genus have a Gram-positive cell wall type. (Beveridge, 1990) It is thought that they appear Gram-negative when Gram stained because their cell walls thin to 12 to 18 nm as they reach stationary phase. Butyrivibrio species are common in the rumens of ruminant animals such as cows, deer and sheep, where they are involved in a number of ruminal functions of agricultural importance in addition to butyrate production. (Miller & Jenesel, 1979) These include fibre degradation, protein breakdown, biohydrogenation of lipids and the production of microbial inhibitors. (Blackburn & Hobson, 1962, Kalmokoff & Teather, 1997, Kepler et al., 1966, Dehority & Scott, 1967, Polan et al., 1964) Of particular importance to ruminant digestion, and therefore productivity, is their contribution to the degradation of plant structural carbohydrates, principally hemicellulose. (Morris & Van Gylswyk, 1980) Butyrivibrio species are metabolically versatile and are able to ferment a wide range of sugars (Stewart et al., 1997) and cellodextrins. (Russell, 1985) Some strains have been reported to break down cellulose,Shane et al., 1969 although their ability to sustain growth on cellulose appears to be lost during in vitro culturing. Most isolates are amylolytic (Cotta, 1988) and are able to degrade xylan by producing xylanolytic (Hespell et al., 1987, Sewell et al., 1988) and esterase enzymes. (Hespell & O'Bryan-Shah, 1988, Lin & Thomson, 1991) The induction of xylanase enzymes varies between strains; in group D1 strains (49, H17c, 12) xylanase expression appears to be constitutively expressed, while groups B1 (113) and C (CF3) are induced only by growth on xylan, and those of group B2 are induced by growth on xylan or arabinose. (Hespell & Whitehead, 1990) A number of genes encoding glycoside hydrolases (GH) have been identified in Butyrivibrio species including endocellulase (GH family 5 and 9); β-Glucosidase (GH family 3); endoxylanase (GH family 10 and 11); β-Xylosidase (GH family 43); and α-Amylase (GH family 13) enzymes. Several carbohydrate binding modules (CBM) have also been identified that are predicted to bind glycogen (CBM family 48); xylan or chitin (CBM family 2); and starch (CBM family 26). (Krause et al., 2003, Cantarel et al., 2008) The Butyrivibrio genus encompasses over 60 strains that were originally confined to the species Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens based on their phenotypic and metabolic characteristics. However, phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences has divided the genus Butyrivibrio into six families. These families include the rumen isolates Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, B. hungateii, B. proteoclasticus, Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans, and P. ruminis and the human isolate B. crossotus. The families B. fibrisolvens, B. crossotus, B. hungateii as well as B. proteoclasticus all belong to the Clostridium sub-cluster XIVa.Willems et al., 1996

This genus contains microbial species that can reside in the human gastrointestinal tract. [PMC 4262072] Decreased in metabolic disorders.



Microbial Abundance Data: Butyrivibrio
(Percent of total population with standard deviation [PMID: 22698087])
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 1 Avg
Buccal
Mucosa
Keratinized
Gingiva
Hard
Palate
Group 2 Avg
Throat
Throat
Tonsils
Saliva
Group 3 Avg
Supragingival
Plaque
Subgingival
Plaque
Stool
0.008 %
(0.022)
0.005 %
(0.016)
0.000 %
(0.002)
0.020 %
(0.048)
0.042 %
(0.085)
0.057 %
(0.092)
0.032 %
(0.062)
0.034 %
(0.079)
0.043 %
(0.105)
0.002 %
(0.015)
0.000 %
(0.003)
0.004 %
(0.027)
0.000 %
(0.000)
TAGS
Keystone
Core species
Type species
Pathogen
Dysbiosis associated
Flora/ commensal
Gut associated
Probiotic
Leanness
Obesity
Skin microbiome
Fecal distribution
Oral microbiome
Vaginal microbiome
Butyrate producer
Catalase producer
Histamine producer
Food fermenter
Amylolytic
Propionate producer
Nitrifying
Biofilm producer
DESCENDANTS
INTERACTIONS
ENHANCES
  • Bacteroidales
  • Bacteroides
  • Odoribacter
  • Peptococcaceae
  • Bacteroidales
  • Bacteroides
  • Odoribacter
  • Peptococcaceae
  • Bacteroidales
  • Bacteroides
  • Odoribacter
  • Peptococcaceae

  • INHIBITS
  • Bifidobacterium
  • Coriobacteriales
  • Adlercreutzia
  • Collinsella
  • Porphyromonas
  • Prevotella
  • Clostridium
  • Clostridiales incertae sedis
  • Clostridiales Family XIII. Incertae Sedis
  • Blautia
  • Coprococcus
  • Dorea
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Ruminococcaceae
  • Ruminococcus
  • Dialister
  • Campylobacteraceae
  • Erysipelotrichaceae
  • Bifidobacterium
  • Coriobacteriales
  • Adlercreutzia
  • Collinsella
  • Porphyromonas
  • Prevotella
  • Clostridium
  • Clostridiales incertae sedis
  • Clostridiales Family XIII. Incertae Sedis
  • Blautia
  • Coprococcus
  • Dorea
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Ruminococcaceae
  • Ruminococcus
  • Dialister
  • Campylobacteraceae
  • Erysipelotrichaceae
  • Bifidobacterium
  • Coriobacteriales
  • Adlercreutzia
  • Collinsella
  • Porphyromonas
  • Prevotella
  • Clostridium
  • Clostridiales incertae sedis
  • Clostridiales Family XIII. Incertae Sedis
  • Blautia
  • Coprococcus
  • Dorea
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Ruminococcaceae
  • Ruminococcus
  • Dialister
  • Campylobacteraceae
  • Erysipelotrichaceae

  • INHIBITED BY
  • Bifidobacterium
  • Coriobacteriales
  • Adlercreutzia
  • Collinsella
  • Bacteroidales
  • Bacteroides
  • Porphyromonadaceae
  • Odoribacter
  • Parabacteroides
  • Porphyromonas
  • Prevotella
  • Rikenellaceae
  • Alistipes
  • Turicibacter
  • Streptococcus
  • Clostridiales
  • Catabacteriaceae
  • Clostridium
  • Clostridiales incertae sedis
  • Peptoniphilus
  • Clostridiales Family XIII. Incertae Sedis
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Blautia
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Coprococcus
  • Dorea
  • Eubacterium
  • Lachnobacterium
  • Lachnospira
  • Roseburia
  • Lachnospiraceae
  • Peptococcaceae
  • Ruminococcaceae
  • Ruminiclostridium
  • Acetivibrio
  • Eubacterium
  • Faecalibacterium
  • Oscillospira
  • Ruminococcus
  • Acidaminococcus
  • Dialister
  • Phascolarctobacterium
  • Veillonella
  • Rubrivivax
  • Alcaligenaceae
  • Oxalobacter
  • Bilophila
  • Desulfovibrio
  • Campylobacteraceae
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Escherichia
  • Erysipelotrichaceae
  • Erysipelotrichaceae
  • Holdemania
  • Akkermansia
  • KEGG PATHWAYS
  • 2-Oxocarboxylic acid metabolism
  • ABC transporters
  • Alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism
  • Amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism
  • Aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis
  • Arachidonic acid metabolism
  • Arginine and proline metabolism
  • Arginine biosynthesis
  • Ascorbate and aldarate metabolism
  • Bacterial chemotaxis
  • Bacterial secretion system
  • Base excision repair
  • Benzoate degradation
  • Biosynthesis of amino acids
  • Biosynthesis of antibiotics
  • Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites
  • Biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids
  • Biotin metabolism
  • Butanoate metabolism
  • C5-Branched dibasic acid metabolism
  • Carbapenem biosynthesis
  • Carbon metabolism
  • Cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) resistance
  • Chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation
  • Citrate cycle (TCA cycle)
  • Cyanoamino acid metabolism
  • Cysteine and methionine metabolism
  • D-Alanine metabolism
  • D-Glutamine and D-glutamate metabolism
  • DNA replication
  • Degradation of aromatic compounds
  • Fatty acid biosynthesis
  • Fatty acid degradation
  • Fatty acid metabolism
  • Flagellar assembly
  • Folate biosynthesis
  • Fructose and mannose metabolism
  • Galactose metabolism
  • Glutathione metabolism
  • Glycerolipid metabolism
  • Glycerophospholipid metabolism
  • Glycine, serine and threonine metabolism
  • Glycolysis / Gluconeogenesis
  • Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism
  • Histidine metabolism
  • Homologous recombination
  • Inositol phosphate metabolism
  • Limonene and pinene degradation
  • Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis
  • Lysine biosynthesis
  • Lysine degradation
  • Metabolic pathways
  • Methane metabolism
  • Microbial metabolism in diverse environments
  • Mismatch repair
  • Monobactam biosynthesis
  • Nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism
  • Nitrogen metabolism
  • Nonribosomal peptide structures
  • Novobiocin biosynthesis
  • Nucleotide excision repair
  • One carbon pool by folate
  • Other glycan degradation
  • Oxidative phosphorylation
  • Pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis
  • Pentose and glucuronate interconversions
  • Pentose phosphate pathway
  • Peptidoglycan biosynthesis
  • Phenylalanine metabolism
  • Phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis
  • Phosphotransferase system (PTS)
  • Polyketide sugar unit biosynthesis
  • Porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism
  • Propanoate metabolism
  • Protein export
  • Purine metabolism
  • Pyrimidine metabolism
  • Pyruvate metabolism
  • Quorum sensing00253
  • RNA degradation
  • RNA polymerase
  • Riboflavin metabolism
  • Ribosome
  • Selenocompound metabolism
  • Sphingolipid metabolism
  • Starch and sucrose metabolism
  • Streptomycin biosynthesis
  • Sulfur metabolism
  • Sulfur relay system
  • Taurine and hypotaurine metabolism
  • Terpenoid backbone biosynthesis
  • Thiamine metabolism
  • Tryptophan metabolism
  • Two-component system
  • Tyrosine metabolism
  • Valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis
  • Valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation
  • Vancomycin resistance
  • Vitamin B6 metabolism
  • beta-Alanine metabolism
  • beta-Lactam resistance

  • CLUSTERS WITH
    METABOLOMICS       
    ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE   BIOFILM FORMERS   
    COGEM PATHOGENICITY   

    SUBSTRATA™ IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK ® OF DATAPUNK BIOINFORMATICS, LLC. COPYRIGHT © 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.    |    DEVELOPER BLOG     |