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Staphylococcus haemolyticus

RANK: Species

TAXONOMY: Terrabacteria group -> Firmicutes -> Bacilli -> Bacillales -> Staphylococcaceae -> Staphylococcus -> Staphylococcus haemolyticus

OVERVIEW:

Staphylococcus haemolyticus is a member of the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). It is part of the skin flora of humans, and its largest populations are usually found at the axillae, perineum, and inguinal areas. S. haemolyticus also colonizes primates and domestic animals. It is a well-known opportunistic pathogen, and is the second most frequently isolated CoNS (S. epidermidis is the first). Infections can be localized or systemic, and are often associated with the insertion of medical devices. The highly antibiotic resistant phenotype and ability to form biofilms make S. haemolyticus a difficult pathogen to treat. S. haemolyticus is non-motile, non-sporulating, facultatively anaerobic, and Gram-stain positive. Cells are typically coccus-shaped and range from 0.8-1.3 μm in diameter. It lives on a wide variety of substrates, including (but not limited to): glucose, glycerol, maltose, sucrose, and trehalose. It also tests positive for acetoin production, arginine, dihydrolase, benzidine, catalase, hemolysis, and lipase; it tests negative for coagulase, DNase, ornithine decarboxylase, phosphatase, urease, and oxidase.

This species has been identified as a resident in the human gastrointestinal tract based on the phylogenetic framework of its small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences.[PMC 4262072]

2

COGEM
COGEM released a comprehensive database of pathogenicity assessment of around 2575 bacterial species in 2011. The database ranks the pathogenicity of species on a scale of 1 to 4. Staphylococcus haemolyticus ranks 2 on this scale: Species that can cause diseases in humans or animals, which are unlikely to spread in the human population and for which an adequate prophylaxis or therapy exists


TAGS >
Keystone
Core species
Type species
Pathogen
Dysbiosis associated
Flora/ commensal
Gut associated
Probiotic
Leanness
Obesity
Skin microbiome
Fecal distribution
Oral microbiome
Vaginal microbiome
Butyrate producer
Catalase producer
Histamine producer
Food fermenter
Amylolytic
Propionate producer
Nitrifying
Biofilm producer
INTERACTIONS
KEGG PATHWAYS

CLUSTERS WITH
Group 7
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis
  • Leuconostoc mesenteroides
  • Lactobacillus acidophilus
  • Lactobacillus plantarum
  • Bacillus cereus
  • Streptococcus thermophilus
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • Pediococcus pentosaceus
  • Bacteroides fragilis
  • Staphylococcus saprophyticus
  • Clostridium perfringens
  • Listeria innocua
  • Corynebacterium jeikeium
  • Lactobacillus sakei
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Streptococcus sanguinis
  • Streptococcus pyogenes
  • Lactobacillus casei
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Lactobacillus brevis
  • Enterococcus faecalis
  • Streptococcus agalactiae
  • Fusobacterium nucleatum
  • Lactococcus lactis
  • Streptococcus gordonii
  • Staphylococcus haemolyticus
  • Group 10
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Streptococcus pyogenes
  • Burkholderia multivorans
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Streptococcus agalactiae
  • Staphylococcus saprophyticus
  • Enterobacter
  • Staphylococcus haemolyticus
  • Propionibacterium acnes
  • Group 44
  • Zymomonas mobilis
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae
  • Corynebacterium glutamicum
  • Corynebacterium efficiens
  • Staphylococcus haemolyticus
  • Corynebacterium jeikeium
  • Arthrobacter
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